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31

Aug

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38 plays

One of Paul Simon’s finest ballads, “Kathy’s Song”, still echoes throughout the hearts of many fans and recording studios. Eva Cassidy’s interpretation beautifully opens her 2000 posthumously-released album, Time After Time. At such a young age, Cassidy passed away on November 2, 1996 from melanoma — never seeing the worldwide acclaim her singing (and guitar-playing) brought her. This taped recording was a demo version (for music producer, Chris Biondo), in which she abbreviated the lyrics. In her live performances, she sang all the verses in full.

Recorded in 1965, the Simon & Garfunkel version appeared on their Sounds of Silence album, with Paul Simon taking the lead solo. The song had previously been featured earlier in the year on The Paul Simon Songbook, which he had recorded and released over in England. Eva Cassidy’s legacy continues living on through her recordings and emotive interpretations of songs.

"And as I watch the drops of rain
Weave their weary paths and die
I know that I am like the rain
There but for the grace of you go I”

What are your thoughts of Cassidy’s cover? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

21

Jul

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61 plays

Legendary progressive rock band, Yes, create and cover a musical landscape in their version of Simon & Garfunkel’s “America”. With Jon Anderson leading the vocals, this rock cover “showcases the talent of this band and notably the bass of Chris Squire, the guitar of Steve Howe, and the keyboards of Rick Wakeman”. Originally released in 1972, “America” was a non-album single clocking in at 10 minutes, 32 seconds. This post features the single edit, which finally appeared on the 2003 remastering of Close To The Edge.

Also in 1972, Simon & Garfunkel released their Greatest Hits album, with “America” spun as a promoting radio single. The song did not chart as well but remains a fan favorite years later. In comparison to Yes’s versions, the original song describes a changing America (at that time) in just under 4 minutes.

""Kathy, I’m lost," I said, thought I knew she was sleeping.
“I’m empty and aching and I don’t know why.”
Counting the cars on the New Jersey Turnpike
They’ve all come to look for America!”

What are your thoughts of Yes’s cover? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

(Source: zeegrooves.blogspot.com)

16

Jun

Art Garfunkel sings "God Bless America" during Phillies stretch

Video of Art Garfunkel singing “God Bless America” at the Philadelphia Phillies game (on Sunday, June 15, 2014); with Tab Laven playing guitar.

Stumbled across on rattling-the-teacups, originally posted by i-love-artie.

Additional links

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121 plays

From the jazz singers line-up comes Carmen McRae and her fiery cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s 1965 breakthrough hit, “The Sound of Silence”. McRae was well-known for being an insightful interpreter of lyrics: “Every word is very important to me. Lyrics come first, then the melody.” Releasing her rendition in 1968, she sings soulfully with the full backing of a jazz band until the very end.

Simon and Garfunkel recorded the song (the original and acoustic version) on March 10, 1964. Then on June 15, 1965, Tom Wilson recorded the electric overdub after a recording session of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone”. The electrified song, paired with “We Got A Groovey Thing”, was released in September 1965; and the rest is history: climbing up the music charts and becoming an anthem to a nation in tumultuous times – even to this day.

And the sign flashed out its warning
In the words that it was forming
And the sign said “The words of the prophets

Are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls
And whispered in the sound of …”

What are your thoughts of McRae’s rendition? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

(Source: covermesongs.com)

30

May

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153 plays

It’s no surprise that Paul Simon selected Aretha Franklin’s gospel cover of “Bridge Over Troubled Water” to be on his Songwriter compilation. Aretha carries the song from start to finish in true songstress manner, and honors its gospel roots. After all, the song title originated from a line in a Baptist church hymn.

Released on January 26, 1970, Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water” shot up to #1 on the Billboards Hot 100 chart within a month. A year later in March 1971, Aretha’s rendition was released, and also achieved the #1 and #6 spots on the US R&B and Pop music charts, respectively. Both versions earned their performers Grammys.

"(Don’t trouble the water)
I won’t (leave it alone)
(Why don’t you, why don’t you, let it be?)
(Still water run deep… yes it do)
I know that
(Whoa-o-o-yeah)
If you only believe…
Just like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down”

What are your thoughts of Aretha’s cover? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

15

May

Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel smiling from the looking glass in a London boutique shop, circa October 1966.
Simon and Garfunkel were amonst the many artists photographed by Don Hunstein, who worked in various publicity roles at Columbia, most notably as the chief staff photographer.
Photos of Simon & Garfunkel, Miles Davis, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan and many more artists are featured in his new photography book, Keeping Time: The Photographs of Don Hunstein, with a foreword by Art Garfunkel. The retrospective is published by Insight Editions.
—
Photo credit: Don Hunstein
Additional links
Don Hunstein’s Artist Shots - includes more photos of Simon & Garfunkel et al.
Book description by Insight Editions
More photos on the Simon & Garfunkel Scrapbook

Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel smiling from the looking glass in a London boutique shop, circa October 1966.

Simon and Garfunkel were amonst the many artists photographed by Don Hunstein, who worked in various publicity roles at Columbia, most notably as the chief staff photographer.

Photos of Simon & Garfunkel, Miles Davis, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan and many more artists are featured in his new photography book, Keeping Time: The Photographs of Don Hunstein, with a foreword by Art Garfunkel. The retrospective is published by Insight Editions.

Photo credit: Don Hunstein

Additional links

(Source: Mother Jones)