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22

Sep

Album Art
38 plays

Fictional playboy Richard Cory first came to life (and death) in Edwin Arlington Robinson’s 1897 poem, then was forever immortalized in Simon & Garfunkel’s musical interpretation. Recorded in December 1965 and released the following month, “Richard Cory” glimmers on Simon & Garfunkel’s 1966 Sounds of Silence album. Both Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel share lead vocals duties on this non-single tune.

That same year in April, Them, a Belfast garage rock band fronted by Van Morrison, recorded two different versions of “Richard Cory”. Version 1 was similar to the style and pace of Simon & Garfunkel’s original but with a garage rock flair. Version 2, featured in this post, was arranged with a slower pace but just as rocky. This cover was Them’s last official single and unfortunately did not see much chart success. To further exacerbate the matter, its release irritated Morrison, who wanted his penned song “Mighty Like A Rose” to be the prospective single. By September 1966, Them disbanded and splintered into their own musical paths – with Morrison achieving a successful solo career.

"But I, I, work in his factory
And I don’t dig the life I’m livin’
I curse my poverty
And I wish that I could be
And I wish that I could be
Well, I wish that I could be, Richard Cory

Yeah, I wish that I could be
Lord, I wish that I could be
Yeah, I wish that I could be
Yes, oh I wish that I could be
Just like Richard Cory”

What are your thoughts of Them’s cover (featuring Van Morrison)? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

(Source: garagehangover.com)

09

Sep

Album Art
498 plays

Cecilia lives on – in a new song! Borrowing the back beat and chorus from Simon & Garfunkel’s 1970 original “Cecilia”, The Vamps give a new dimension and additional personality to Cecilia as she continues breaking more hearts. Just like Ace of Base’s 1998 re-imagining, the infamous lover will “live forever” in many more song re-incarnations and covers.

"Oh Cecilia (Breaking My Heart)", a fan favorite tune, was written by the UK music group, The Vamps, and features a Canadian YouTube star, Shawn Mendes. The single is from their 2014 album, Meet The Vamps. Slated for an October 12, 2014 release, “Oh Cecilia” will be The Vamps fifth UK single, following Top 5 hits “Can We Dance”, “Wild Heart”, “Last Night” and “Somebody To You” (with Demi Lovato).

Album cover of the deluxe edition of 'Meet The Vamps'

Here’s a lyrical excerpt from the song:

"Had the girl of my dreams,
And now she’s all gone.
Thought that we could last forever,
I was all wrong.
Said that talking was cheap,
But now I’m flat broke.
She don’t even wanna
See my face anymore.

She don’t wanna say,
When she’s gone away.
Cause she’s on replay in my, in my brain.
I know what it takes,
Name a time and place.
We can turn a break-up,
Into an out break!”

Additional links

31

Aug

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361 plays

One of Paul Simon’s finest ballads, “Kathy’s Song”, still echoes throughout the hearts of many fans and recording studios. Eva Cassidy’s interpretation beautifully opens her 2000 posthumously-released album, Time After Time. At such a young age, Cassidy passed away on November 2, 1996 from melanoma — never seeing the worldwide acclaim her singing (and guitar-playing) brought her. This taped recording was a demo version (for music producer, Chris Biondo), in which she abbreviated the lyrics. In her live performances, she sang all the verses in full.

Recorded in 1965, the Simon & Garfunkel version appeared on their Sounds of Silence album, with Paul Simon taking the lead solo. The song had previously been featured earlier in the year on The Paul Simon Songbook, which he had recorded and released over in England. Eva Cassidy’s legacy continues living on through her recordings and emotive interpretations of songs.

"And as I watch the drops of rain
Weave their weary paths and die
I know that I am like the rain
There before the grace of you go I”

What are your thoughts of Cassidy’s cover? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

21

Jul

Album Art
83 plays

Legendary progressive rock band, Yes, create and cover a musical landscape in their version of Simon & Garfunkel’s “America”. With Jon Anderson leading the vocals, this rock cover “showcases the talent of this band and notably the bass of Chris Squire, the guitar of Steve Howe, and the keyboards of Rick Wakeman”. Originally released in 1972, “America” was a non-album single clocking in at 10 minutes, 32 seconds. This post features the single edit, which finally appeared on the 2003 remastering of Close To The Edge.

Also in 1972, Simon & Garfunkel released their Greatest Hits album, with “America” spun as a promoting radio single. The song did not chart as well but remains a fan favorite years later. In comparison to Yes’s versions, the original song describes a changing America (at that time) in just under 4 minutes.

""Kathy, I’m lost," I said, thought I knew she was sleeping.
“I’m empty and aching and I don’t know why.”
Counting the cars on the New Jersey Turnpike
They’ve all come to look for America!”

What are your thoughts of Yes’s cover? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

(Source: zeegrooves.blogspot.com)

16

Jun

Art Garfunkel sings "God Bless America" during Phillies stretch

Video of Art Garfunkel singing “God Bless America” at the Philadelphia Phillies game (on Sunday, June 15, 2014); with Tab Laven playing guitar.

Stumbled across on rattling-the-teacups, originally posted by i-love-artie.

Additional links

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149 plays

From the jazz singers line-up comes Carmen McRae and her fiery cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s 1965 breakthrough hit, “The Sound of Silence”. McRae was well-known for being an insightful interpreter of lyrics: “Every word is very important to me. Lyrics come first, then the melody.” Releasing her rendition in 1968, she sings soulfully with the full backing of a jazz band until the very end.

Simon and Garfunkel recorded the song (the original and acoustic version) on March 10, 1964. Then on June 15, 1965, Tom Wilson recorded the electric overdub after a recording session of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone”. The electrified song, paired with “We Got A Groovey Thing”, was released in September 1965; and the rest is history: climbing up the music charts and becoming an anthem to a nation in tumultuous times – even to this day.

And the sign flashed out its warning
In the words that it was forming
And the sign said “The words of the prophets

Are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls
And whispered in the sound of …”

What are your thoughts of McRae’s rendition? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

(Source: covermesongs.com)