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14

Apr

Album Art
340 plays

Progressive rockers Coheed and Cambria’s delicate delivery of “April Come She Will” ushers in spring. With frontman Claudio Sanchez’s lead vocals, this rare cover further reveals the musical depth and range of a band more known for their progressive rock, heavy metal, and post hardcore sounds.

In 1965, Paul Simon originally recorded and released the song on The Paul Simon Songbook. Simon and Garfunkel followed suite in December 1965 with their recording for their Sounds of Silence. Forty-six years later, for Christmas time of 2011, Coheed and Cambria debuted their cover version on YouTube.

"April, come she will
When streams are ripe and swelled with rain”

What are your thoughts of this band’s rendition? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

07

Apr

The hilarious part about The Graduate album for me is that I wasn’t sure why I was hired. I got there and Paul had been working on new songs for some time, but Mike almost had the picture cut with existing Simon & Garfunkel material. The few things that I wrote were little source-music pieces.

Jazz pianist and composer, Dave Grusin, on contributing to The Graduate soundtrack.

Grusin specifically composed these “little source-music pieces”: “The Singleman Foxtrot”, “Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha”, “On the Strip”, “The Folks”, “A Great Effect”, and “Whew”.

Cover artwork of The Graduate soundtrack

Posted in celebration of the 46th anniversary of Simon & Garfunkel and Dave Grusin’s The Graduate soundtrack, which was a #1 album nine consecutive weeks on April 6, 1968.

Additional links

24

Mar

Album Art
80 plays

From the quieter front of the British Invasion, The Quiet Five emerged then receded in the latter half of the Sixties. Their 1966 release of “Homeward Bound” landed in the British Top 50 music chart at #44. Though soon after, Simon & Garfunkel’s original version would cast a shadow and successfully chart in the UK Top Ten (#9).

The London-based sextet’s recording characterizes a classic band on the move: “a tour of one-night stands”. Despite their hushed journey on the charts, the Quiet Five carried on as a popular live act; often covering songs of their British contemporaries such as The Rolling Stones and The Byrds. Eventually, the group disbanded with members Kris Ife and Richard Barnes each pursuing solo careers.

"Tonight I’ll sing my songs again
I’ll play the game and pretend
But all my words come back to me
In shades of mediocrity
Like emptiness in harmony
I need someone to comfort me”

What are your thoughts of this band’s rendition? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

24

Feb

Album Art
93 plays

In true ska-pop rhythm, Graham “Suggs” McPherson delivers a “new” sound to Simon & Garfunkel’s “Cecilia”. The track also features the female raggamuffin duo, Louchie Lou & Michie One. From the perspective of ‘heartbreaker’ Cecilia, they rebuke the persona for his late night outs and mistreatment – in classic reggae rap form. Additionally, the two provide the background vocals.

Prior to a solo recording career, Suggs had served as the frontman for the English ska band, Madness. This cover song was one of his most successful releases, charting at #4 in the United Kingdom in 1996. While conversely, Simon & Garfunkel’s 1970 original recording charted at #4 in the United States but did not chart in the United Kingdom.

"Hey, you should know you never treat me too right
Should’ve come home you shouldn’t stay out at night
Think you never know you shouldn’t treat me this way
And you know I wouldn’t stray
Man, you should’ve known you could have give me everything
Go down on your knee, you should’ve put on the ring
Oh deny the rest, to me alone you should sing
And you know I wouldn’t stray, no way

Jubilation, she loves me again
I fall on the floor and I love it
Oh, jubilation she loves me again
I fall on the floor and I love it”

What are your thoughts of this collaborative rendition? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.

12

Feb

What song could Paul Simon have been singing then? Perhaps a tune from The Paul Simon Songbook. Like “The Side of a Hill”? “A Church Is Burning”? Or maybe, the soon-to-be world famous “The Sound of Silence”.

A couple of sites point to 1965 as to when he visited the Jacquard Folk Club – in Norwich, Norfolk in the United Kingdom.

Stumbled across on songs-of-america, originally posted by luckyloser93:

Paul Simon at the Jacquard Folk Club in Norwich, 1960s

Additional links

31

Jan

Album Art
115 plays

Jonatha Brooke's musical reinterpretation of Simon & Garfunkel's “Bleecker Street” commences this year's monthly music series focusing on Simon & Garfunkel tunes. Her wistful rendition modernizes a snapshot of a now forgotten music scene era (in Greenwich Village). 

Released in May 1999, this rare track opened the musical tribute aptly titled Bleecker Street: Greenwich Village in the 60’s. The original "Bleecker Street" song was released on the duo’s debut album, Wednesday Morning, 3AM, in October 1964.

"Voices leaking from a sad café
Smiling faces trying to understand
I saw a shadow touch a shadow’s hand
On Bleecker Street”

What are your thoughts of this artist’s rendition? Which version do you prefer? 

About the Uncovering Covers series.

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, such that this music series aims to spotlight musical gems as well as new and familiar artists. Cover songs will draw from the grand discographies of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, including both the duo’s and their solo works. 

This year’s series will focus on the Simon & Garfunkel catalogue.