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30

Nov

Art Garfunkel cameos in an episode of Flight of the Conchords (season 2, episode 7, “Prime Minister”). The scene shows Garfunkel visiting Karen, a former lover (played by Mary Lynn Rajskub), who is still equally enamoured of her visitor. Meanwhile, Jermaine’s character narrowly escapes a “Garfunkling” situation with Karen.

Original air date was March 1, 2009.

Stumbled across on melodysustainin.

Art Garfunkel talked to TV Guide about his Conchords appearance, what “Garfunkling” means to him, his 2009 reunion with Paul Simon, his recent acting gig and much, much more. 

Read the full interview

17

Nov

39 plays Get

Smooth Radio UK host Mark Goodier talks with Art Garfunkel about The Singer, perspectives as a singer, and his relationship with Paul Simon.

Original air date from October 29, 2012. Interview recorded on October 17, 2012.

(Source: smoothradio.co.uk)

11

Nov

For amusement, here’s slightly modified lyrics of Simon & Garfunkel’s “America" (1968) with a pinch of Dishwalla’s "Counting Blue Cars" (1996) to form…
♪ Counting blue cars on the New Jersey Turnpike ♫
Always paired these two disparate songs together simply because of that single lyrical thread. Nothing more than Kathy, God, and cars. ♪ Tell me all your thoughts…?
Plus, an accompanying photograph of blue cars (and truck) on the New Jersey Turnpike.
Count the blue cars for yourself
—
Photo credit: Doug Kerr

For amusement, here’s slightly modified lyrics of Simon & Garfunkel’s “America" (1968) with a pinch of Dishwalla’s "Counting Blue Cars" (1996) to form…

Counting blue cars on the New Jersey Turnpike ♫

Always paired these two disparate songs together simply because of that single lyrical thread. Nothing more than Kathy, God, and cars. ♪ Tell me all your thoughts…?

Plus, an accompanying photograph of blue cars (and truck) on the New Jersey Turnpike.

Count the blue cars for yourself

Photo credit: Doug Kerr

05

Nov

Happy 71st Birthday, Martial Art Garfunkel!
An awesome t-shirt design featuring our favorite tenor of Simon & Garfunkel.
Product listing from Big Stone Head
"Garfunkel: "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?"
(He delivers a devastating open-palm strike through a brick wall. Joe DiMaggio, terrified, hides behind a rusty filing cabinet. He tries not to breathe. He has never been so scared.)
Garfunkel: “Our nation turns its lonely eyes to you.”
(A single bead of sweat falls from DiMaggio’s cheek — or is it a tear? Regardless, it cascades to the ground with an audible splash. Garfunkel’s head darts toward him, and suddenly the filing cabinet is airborne. Garfunkel’s legs are a blur of roundhouse kicks. This is it.)
Cross the bridge over troubled water in this 100% combed cotton, sweatshop-free, amazingly comfy black American Apparel t-shirt. They fit a little snug and also shrink almost a whole size in the first wash. So if you’re on the fence, order the bigger size.”
—
Design by Avery Monsen and Jory John, authors and illustrators of All My Friends Are Dead.

And yet another link.

Happy 71st Birthday, Martial Art Garfunkel!

An awesome t-shirt design featuring our favorite tenor of Simon & Garfunkel.

Product listing from Big Stone Head

"Garfunkel: "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?"

(He delivers a devastating open-palm strike through a brick wall. Joe DiMaggio, terrified, hides behind a rusty filing cabinet. He tries not to breathe. He has never been so scared.)

Garfunkel: “Our nation turns its lonely eyes to you.”

(A single bead of sweat falls from DiMaggio’s cheek — or is it a tear? Regardless, it cascades to the ground with an audible splash. Garfunkel’s head darts toward him, and suddenly the filing cabinet is airborne. Garfunkel’s legs are a blur of roundhouse kicks. This is it.)

Cross the bridge over troubled water in this 100% combed cotton, sweatshop-free, amazingly comfy black American Apparel t-shirt. They fit a little snug and also shrink almost a whole size in the first wash. So if you’re on the fence, order the bigger size.

Design by Avery Monsen and Jory John, authors and illustrators of All My Friends Are Dead.
And yet another link.

01

Nov

A story about Sandy Greenberg and his friendship with Art Garfunkel

"In his youth, Sandy was a very good student, but he came from a poor family. And so he went to Columbia University on a scholarship, and there he met his roommate, who also was receiving financial aid.

Now while he was a sophomore at Columbia University, he contracted an eye disease that eventually proved to be glaucoma. But the trouble was, it wasn’t detected early enough, and as a result he became legally blind, while still a student at Columbia. I ask you all to imagine for a moment having been sighted all your life, and then all of a sudden being faced, in a very competitive school, with losing so much sight you could no longer read. This is what happened to our trustee, Sandy Greenberg.

But something else happened to Sandy that may surprise you. Sandy said that when he lost his sight, his roommate began to read his textbooks to him, every night.

So I’m going to put you in that position, in a competitive school like Columbia, or Johns Hopkins. If your roommate had a serious disability, would you take the time to read textbooks to him every night, knowing the more you spend time reading textbooks to your roommate, perhaps the less well you might do with your other activities? That’s not as easy a question as it first appears.

But luckily for Sandy, our trustee, his roommate did. And as a result, Sandy went on to graduate with honors. He got a Fulbright Scholarship, and he went off to study at Oxford. He was still quite poor, but he said he had managed to save about five hundred dollars as he went along.

His roommate, meanwhile, also went on to graduate school. One day, Sandy got a call from him at Oxford. And his former roommate said, “Sandy I’m really unhappy. I really don’t like being in graduate school, and I don’t want to do this.”

So Sandy asked, “Well what do you want to do?”

And his roommate told him, “Sandy, I really love to sing. I have a high school friend who plays the guitar. And we would really like to try our hand in the music business. But we need to make a promo record, and in order to do that I need $500.”

So Sandy Greenberg told me he took all his life savings and sent it to his roommate. He told me, “You know, what else could I do? He made my life; I needed to help make his life.” So, I hope you’ll remember the power of doing well by doing good. Each of you, in your own lives, will be faced with challenges, with roadblocks, with problems that you didn’t anticipate or expect. How you are able to deal with adversity will be influenced, to no small extent, by how you deal with others along the way. What you get will depend a lot on what you give. And that’s the end of the story of doing well, by doing good.

Ah! I almost forgot. You probably are wanting to know who Sandy’s roommate was. I think you’ve heard of him. Sandy’s roommate was a fellow by the name of Art Garfunkel, and he teamed up with another musician by the name of Paul Simon. That $500 helped them cut a record that eventually became “The Sounds of Silence.” Recently, we had the pleasure of going to Sandy’s daughter’s wedding, and it was Art Garfunkel who sang as Sandy walked his daughter down the aisle.”

2005 commencement remarks by William R. Brody, President of The Johns Hopkins University. Delivered on May 26, 2005.

Complete commencement remarks

Stumbled upon the Simon & Garfunkel Message Board.

29

Oct

Forty-four years ago on October 29, 1968, Simon & Garfunkel performed at Ohio University.

More photos and a first-person commentary: http://www.capecentralhigh.com/ohio/covering-simon-and-garfunkel/

Photo of Simon and Garfunkel in concert at Ohio University on October 29, 1968imageimage

Photo credit: Ken Steinhoff (retired newspaper photographer)

Stumbled across on simonandgarfunkel